facephenom

facebrick

facebrick facebuilt facebroke faceblind facedearth
faceboss facetomb facepop facedough facetious
facestitch facetouch facebotch facebach faceberth
facestill facestone facequiet facepiece facemirth
facebush faceface facephone facespill facer
facecross facetoss facemoss facetaste facemill
facevalve faceback facade faceplay faceout
facetone facemoan faceme faceyou facepull
faceposh facerush facemush facebrush facetilt
facsimile factotum facecap facemask facetome
facedrone facetill facetree faceroad facelift
facesky facefront faceit facebuck faceroam
facethis faucet facet facetrick faceroom
faceless facemuse faceup facestop faceboom

9 Comments Add yours

  1. Lisa Groves says:

    A fun to read poem and several ways to read: left to right return, by columns, from the middle outward. I started from left to right and was waiting to see if facade was in this poem. when i found it in the middle i went crazy and started reading all over the place then, back to facade to the end. It was a facefull of words. I like it.

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    1. Joe Linker says:

      Thanks, Lis! I’m glad you saw the reading options. I wrote it in an Excel file and then pasted it into the WordPress post. The first version did not contain facade, btw. A Twitter connection mentioned it, and I’m like, duh! And so I went back and stuck it in the middle. I like your “facenap.” I discarded a bunch of facewords: faceblush, faceslap, faceclose, faceopen, facelong, facedali (it melts and bends), facemoney, facegloss. Maybe I’ll do a facephenom part two. Or you can pick it up. Thanks for reading and commenting, as always. Hope all’s well with you guys. … PS: The facebrick photo btw is an original. I took it walking around downtown NW Portland one day a few years ago. Joe

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      1. Joe Linker says:

        Lisa: PPS: Next morning…thinking of a program that would substitute new words at random within the original frame. It would be easy to do manually, of course, but a program should not be hard to write. Provide for a stock of facewords and each day the program would pick one at random and use it to replace one of the used facewords. Over time, a new poem would emerge, but a new reader would not know the poem changed over time unless re-reading it everyday, every week, every hour, however frequent the change specification was written. What would be the point? Why not just write a new poem? Someone may be already doing this. I don’t know. It’s a variation, I guess, of the fade out, fade in technique – of images. Maybe write the program so the words fade out and new words fade in as the reader reads, the words changing almost imperceptibly, so that by the time readers get to the last word, some of the words they’ve passed above have evolved, disappearing, others taking their place. The reader notices, something’s not right, stares, and even while looking at a word, facestare, suddenly the reader see a new word, in the same square, faceback. Joe

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  2. There’s a scene where faces flow like landscapes before the inner eyes of my protagonist in Cabal of Mirrors.
    Shame I can’t post a photo here. Have one of a lovely ‘square-faced’ house in Sidni Ifni (Morocco.)

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    1. Joe Linker says:

      The face as landscape, deep rivers worn in the brow from worrying about the weather. A nose sticking straight up like a volcano. Will it erupt? A mouth of quicksand. A mouth a Mammouth Cave. A mouth a Devil’s Punch Bowl. A mouth a bird’s nest. A tongue a seaweed. Cheeks of sand dunes. Ears like tree branches. Eyes like roses. Eyes like peonies. Lips like wet leaves.

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